Organized by CEMAT & CEMA, and in collaboration with TALIM, the series will examine how various scholars, authors, and disciplines of the humanities explore issues of public health, sickness, and disease.

This special series will run alongside our established lecture series covering archaeology, art history, cultural and social anthropology, documentary film, geography, history, language and linguistics, music, photography, political economy, political science, and sociology.

The online seminar will also be open to students and scholars, as well as the pre-registered public, free of charge. It will be moderated by our peers and colleagues working in the humanities in the U.S. and North Africa.

Of Jinn Theory and Germ Theory:
Translating Bacteriological Medicine,
and Islamic Law in Algeria

Thursday, September 17, 2020
15:00 (3:00PM)
Tunisia/Algeria time

This is an online Zoom lecture

The Centre d’Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) and the Centre d’Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA) are pleased to invite you to their first joint online lecture on “Of Jinn Theory and Germ Theory: Translating Bacteriological Medicine, and Islamic Law in Algeria”  by Dr. Hannah-Louise Clark, Lecturer in Global Economic and Social History at the University of Glasgow. The lecture is part of ‘The AIMS Health and Humanities in the Maghrib Lecture Series’ and will be moderated by Prof. James McDougall, Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Oxford.

About the Speaker:
Hannah-Louise Clark is a lecturer in Global Economic and Social History at the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Glasgow. She runs the Global History Hackathons project.

Clark has almost two decades of experience researching changing economic, social, and political dynamics and global and imperial interconnections in the modern Middle East and North Africa c. 1800-present. She holds PhD and MA degrees in History/History of Science from Princeton University (2014 and 2010), a diploma in Arabic language and culture from the American University in Cairo (2008), an AM degree in Regional Studies-Middle East from Harvard University (2005), and a BA Honours in Modern History from the University of Oxford (2002). She has lived and studied in Algeria, Egypt, France, Lebanon, and Morocco.

Prior to her current position, Clark was a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow in History at the University of Glasgow (2017-2018). She taught and supervised global and imperial history courses at the University of Oxford as Departmental and College Lecturer in Modern European and World History (2014-2017) and worked at Harvard University’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies (2005-2007).

Moderator:
James McDougall is a Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Oxford. He finished his DPhil in Modern Middle Eastern History and Politics at St Antony’s College, Oxford in 2002. He moved to Princeton in 2004 as an Assistant Professor in the history department, and came back to the UK in 2007, to take up a post in London as Lecturer in the history of Africa